• Successful Presales

    Like it or not, every band is responsible to help bring the crowd to the show; however, not every band participates in presale shows.  For those who do, understand that the presales help support the expenses that may include venue rental, sound technician, door person, security; pre show production costs like flyers, ticket printing, fees for advertising and promotion, ads in local publications and radio, booking fees, insurance costs, production costs for staging, equipment rentals, labor, port-o-lets, perimeter fencing, city permits, photographers; and post show costs including video editing, attorney fees, licensing for cover music, and any additional production costs. 

    1. Know Your Sales Goals: Be sure you know up front (and don’t be shy about asking) just how many tickets your band is expected to sell to fulfill your commitment to the show. Work out the details among your bandmates, set goals for each member to achieve on a weekly basis, and an overall total. Keep in mind that it gets easier to sell tickets closer to the show date, but don’t let that keep you from selling from the start.

    And it may hurt, but be honest in assessing the number of tickets you can actually sell at this stage of your band’s career. Do not commit to selling more tickets (just to get booked) than you can realistically sell. New bands often have to buy their way into a show by bringing in a set number of people; and the promoter will expect that you can bring in the number of people that you say you can. It’s just bad all the way around if you promise what you cannot deliver.

    Don’t be afraid to ask the promoter for tools to help you sell your tickets. They should be happy to provide you with fliers or other materials to assist you in getting tickets sold.

    2. Facebook Marketing: Encourage online sales and use all social media outlets available to you. Event pages on Facebook, promote it on your own Facebook page, blog about it on the band’s website, and Tweet it to the world. Just be sure to always include your contact information; email, telephone numbers, etc. Find out how many they need? Encourage them to bring friends by offering a special for multiple ticket purchases. And don’t forget to ask to be added to the official event page so you can send invitations from there.

    3. E Mail Marketing: Send direct messages to the fans that come out to your shows. You want them to come back and bring more people with them. The personal touch makes them feel appreciated for the time and money they spend to see you. Send them an email, text, or personal facebook message. This definitely helps you build that loyal fan base…. People want to be appreciated for their loyalty to you and your music. 

    Sarge Tip

    For tips on creating a good email list, check out our article “ Build an E-Mail List” – http://musicadvice101.com/buildanemaillist/.

    4. In Person: Reach out to family, friends, and everyone else you know. DO talk to strangers! Talk about your show! Offer tickets to people you encounter at school, work, parties, and people around your neighborhood. 

    Go check out the venue one weekend in advance. Mingle with the crowd that night. Convince them to come back again the next weekend for your show. Offer them a special price or a premium price that includes a free CD or merchandise item if they purchase tickets on the spot. People are more likely to buy while they are having a good time.
    Go to open mic nights and other shows in the area to show your support for other local artists. Networking at other people’s shows is cool as long as you are also supporting their music. Talk to the other bands and invite them out to your show as your guest.

    5. Make it Easy for People to Pay and Receive Them

    Have the option to accept credit cards. Use a reader or app on your phone to make it easy for them to pay on the spot. Pay Pal is another good way to make it easy for them to purchase. Do some research on Eventbrite or Ticketfly; using an outside source can help people buy online a lot easier.

    Remember it is your responsibility to get the tickets to them! It’s true that mailing the tickets to everyone who pre purchases will take a little time and some money for postage; but, snail mail still makes people feel special. And you have the opportunity to include something extra in the envelope; flyers for your next show, a postcard picture promoting your album, maybe even a drink ticket to be redeemed at the bar the night of the show. Be creative with what you can do to promote future shows within that envelope that you are taking the time to mail out.

    Another way to get the tickets out to the people ahead of the show; is to call arrange a meeting place to pick up tickets. Make it a mini-event at a centrally located coffee shop, music store, or pizza place. Your fans will appreciate the face time with the band. It’s a way to get tickets delivered to a number of people at one time and it makes them feel like a part of something bigger than just one show. Work with the shop ahead of time; give them the opportunity to offer something to the folks that gather to pick up their tickets. They may want to have some kind of special or discount coupons ready for them.

    6. Make it Fun, Give Them A Reason to Want to Purchase in Advance

    Make it about the crowd, not just about seeing your band. Find out if anyone has a birthday or special event coming up. Promise (and deliver) a birthday song, or VIP seating/area, bring a cake with their name on it. If you make it a party for them, they will bring friends and people that don’t know your band yet giving you the opportunity to reach new ears.

    Sarge Tip

    Utilize Facebook to find out your friends birthdays, anniversaries, or other occasions that can be turned into a happening at the show.

    Offer VIP passes that have extra value to them… sometimes a limo ride to and from the show, dinner or drinks with the band, autographed CD or t-shirt.
    Make it an event. Connect with a non-profit organization or a fundraiser; whereby a percentage of each ticket sold goes to the cause. This also opens up the conversation when you are talking to people at school, work, etc. about your upcoming show. Connecting with a non-profit or fundraiser can also be really good promo for the band. Often, the organization will send out newsletters, Facebook messages, website ads, etc. promoting your upcoming event.

    Connect with the sponsors… they may possibly foot the bill and pay for the tickets, then you can offer them for free.

    If you are the one producing the show, align with a financial sponsor who may assist in footing the bill for tickets and in exchange you will put them on your website, social media blasts, Facebook and any where else they may be promoted.

    Keep an eye on what other bands are doing. Learn what is working for them to sell and distribute their tickets.

    http://www.thundertix.com/ticket-trends/how-to-sell-presale-tickets-metallicas-orion-music-and-more/
    http://www.grassrootsy.com/2011/03/09/how-do-i-get-my-fans-to-buy-pre-sale-tickets/

    Compiled by Rose’s DamnedOpinion

  • The Different Types of Record Deals

     

    Every musician dreams of the day they are offered a record deal. It’s the golden ticket to a life of fame, fortune, and luxury, right? Well, not always, but getting a record deal is an important step in advancing your music career. However, It’s important to know, that there are many different types of deals out there, and the key is finding the one that best fit’s with your current needs and long-term goals. Here are a few of the most common record deals that you see being offered today.

    1.The Major Label Deal- This is the big one! A major label gives you a lot of money up front (known as an advance), to cover all the cost of creating an awesome album. The major labels have all the tools to promote your album and make you the next superstar. Be careful though, these major labels don’t have much patience. If your album doesn’t do well they won’t hesitate to drop your contract.

    Sarge Tip

    It’s important to know that all royalties you earn from album sales will go towards paying back the advance, until you’ve paid the label back fully. So be sure to spend your advance money wisely!.

    2. The Independent Label Deal- This deal is very similar to the major label deal. The difference is that independent labels are smaller so they give their artist less advance money than a major label would. The good thing about and indie label is that they work very closely with the artist and you will have more creative control over your albums. There are tons of indie labels out there, and the chances of getting a deal with one is much higher than trying to get signed by a major label.

    Sarge Tip

    Just because you’re signed to an independent label, don’t think you can’t still make it big. If Adele, Taylor Swift, and Macklemore can become stars while signed to an indie label you certainly can too! .

    3.The distribution Deal- Also known as a P&D Deal (pressing and distribution), this deal is most common for artists who have had success on their own and want to stay independent. You agree to let a record label help you manufacture, distribute, and promote your album, and in return the label gets a percentage of the sales profits (normally around 25%). Remember, that in this type of deal you don’t get an advance so you’ll have to come up with the money to produce, record, and market the album yourself.

    4. 360 Deals- Also known as equity deals, participation deal, or multiple rights deal, this is the most common deal artists are offered today. In a 360 deal the label makes money not just from music sales, but from almost everything the artist does. The label gets a portion of profits generated from touring, merchandise, books, movie/TV appearances, basically anything the artist makes money from, the label gets a piece of it. This seems like a bad deal for the artists, but it does give the label even more incentive to support your career and to push you to make lots of money in every way possible.

    Sarge Tip

    Everything in a record agreement can be negotiated, depending on how much you bring to the table, and how bad the label wants to sign you. Lastly, before you sign anything make sure you have an entertainment attorney look it over first!.

    Compiled by Ernest Sallee