• Tips for Press Photos

    Sarge_jokersPAYattention Say “CHEEEEESE!” – If you happen to notice someone with a camera running around the venue during your set snapping photos, there are a few things you should keep in-mind to make sure the photos of you and your band don’t come out looking like blurry and out-of-focus blobs. 

    1. When performing, be sure to ‘pose for the press’ during your first few songs. Members of the press are usually only granted a limited time to get good photos from the restricted area near the stage. Make this time work for you.

    Sarge Tip

    Try not to jump around too much or get too sweaty before the photographer is done snapping shots of you.

    2. Try to introduce yourself to all photographers whom you see take your band’s picture. Get the link to the website where the pictures will be posted so that you can use it for your portfolio.

     

    3. Ensure all photo’s you release to be used in flyers and posters are high-resolution and large in size. (500-800 pixels)

     

    Compiled by Monty Burton

  • Write A Press Release

    Press releases are an important part of corresponding with your audience. They provide an informational and informal advertisement of your product. Written correctly, press releases advertise to your audience without being dubbed as an advertisement.

    1. Use a document editor (Microsoft Word or equivalent).

    2. Create a headline for your press release. These headlines should be short and catchy while explaining why the reader should read your release.

    3. Explain the 5 “W’s” (Who, What, When, Where and Why). Include details such as address, age limit, special guest appearances, parking information, drink specials, sponsors of the event and the name of other bands performing.

    4. Keep it clear and concise. Hit key points, but don’t over do it. Generally, around 300 words should do the trick.

    5. CHECK YOUR SPELLING AND GRAMMAR! – If you’re not a good writer, find someone who is.

    Sarge Tip

    Always provide the date of the event on your press release. Many people will spend most of their time making it sound nice and eloquent, but forget the main goal: to inform your audience on the happenings of your brand.

    6. Release to press outlets. Some good ones to reach out to would be your local college radio stations, online radio, weekly magazines and online blogs.

    7. Create incentives for the press. Free entry, press passes and special VIP privilages are great ways to motivate the press to show up to your event. 

    Compiled by Monty Burton