• Successful Presales

    Like it or not, every band is responsible to help bring the crowd to the show; however, not every band participates in presale shows.  For those who do, understand that the presales help support the expenses that may include venue rental, sound technician, door person, security; pre show production costs like flyers, ticket printing, fees for advertising and promotion, ads in local publications and radio, booking fees, insurance costs, production costs for staging, equipment rentals, labor, port-o-lets, perimeter fencing, city permits, photographers; and post show costs including video editing, attorney fees, licensing for cover music, and any additional production costs. 

    1. Know Your Sales Goals: Be sure you know up front (and don’t be shy about asking) just how many tickets your band is expected to sell to fulfill your commitment to the show. Work out the details among your bandmates, set goals for each member to achieve on a weekly basis, and an overall total. Keep in mind that it gets easier to sell tickets closer to the show date, but don’t let that keep you from selling from the start.

    And it may hurt, but be honest in assessing the number of tickets you can actually sell at this stage of your band’s career. Do not commit to selling more tickets (just to get booked) than you can realistically sell. New bands often have to buy their way into a show by bringing in a set number of people; and the promoter will expect that you can bring in the number of people that you say you can. It’s just bad all the way around if you promise what you cannot deliver.

    Don’t be afraid to ask the promoter for tools to help you sell your tickets. They should be happy to provide you with fliers or other materials to assist you in getting tickets sold.

    2. Facebook Marketing: Encourage online sales and use all social media outlets available to you. Event pages on Facebook, promote it on your own Facebook page, blog about it on the band’s website, and Tweet it to the world. Just be sure to always include your contact information; email, telephone numbers, etc. Find out how many they need? Encourage them to bring friends by offering a special for multiple ticket purchases. And don’t forget to ask to be added to the official event page so you can send invitations from there.

    3. E Mail Marketing: Send direct messages to the fans that come out to your shows. You want them to come back and bring more people with them. The personal touch makes them feel appreciated for the time and money they spend to see you. Send them an email, text, or personal facebook message. This definitely helps you build that loyal fan base…. People want to be appreciated for their loyalty to you and your music. 

    Sarge Tip

    For tips on creating a good email list, check out our article “ Build an E-Mail List” – http://musicadvice101.com/buildanemaillist/.

    4. In Person: Reach out to family, friends, and everyone else you know. DO talk to strangers! Talk about your show! Offer tickets to people you encounter at school, work, parties, and people around your neighborhood. 

    Go check out the venue one weekend in advance. Mingle with the crowd that night. Convince them to come back again the next weekend for your show. Offer them a special price or a premium price that includes a free CD or merchandise item if they purchase tickets on the spot. People are more likely to buy while they are having a good time.
    Go to open mic nights and other shows in the area to show your support for other local artists. Networking at other people’s shows is cool as long as you are also supporting their music. Talk to the other bands and invite them out to your show as your guest.

    5. Make it Easy for People to Pay and Receive Them

    Have the option to accept credit cards. Use a reader or app on your phone to make it easy for them to pay on the spot. Pay Pal is another good way to make it easy for them to purchase. Do some research on Eventbrite or Ticketfly; using an outside source can help people buy online a lot easier.

    Remember it is your responsibility to get the tickets to them! It’s true that mailing the tickets to everyone who pre purchases will take a little time and some money for postage; but, snail mail still makes people feel special. And you have the opportunity to include something extra in the envelope; flyers for your next show, a postcard picture promoting your album, maybe even a drink ticket to be redeemed at the bar the night of the show. Be creative with what you can do to promote future shows within that envelope that you are taking the time to mail out.

    Another way to get the tickets out to the people ahead of the show; is to call arrange a meeting place to pick up tickets. Make it a mini-event at a centrally located coffee shop, music store, or pizza place. Your fans will appreciate the face time with the band. It’s a way to get tickets delivered to a number of people at one time and it makes them feel like a part of something bigger than just one show. Work with the shop ahead of time; give them the opportunity to offer something to the folks that gather to pick up their tickets. They may want to have some kind of special or discount coupons ready for them.

    6. Make it Fun, Give Them A Reason to Want to Purchase in Advance

    Make it about the crowd, not just about seeing your band. Find out if anyone has a birthday or special event coming up. Promise (and deliver) a birthday song, or VIP seating/area, bring a cake with their name on it. If you make it a party for them, they will bring friends and people that don’t know your band yet giving you the opportunity to reach new ears.

    Sarge Tip

    Utilize Facebook to find out your friends birthdays, anniversaries, or other occasions that can be turned into a happening at the show.

    Offer VIP passes that have extra value to them… sometimes a limo ride to and from the show, dinner or drinks with the band, autographed CD or t-shirt.
    Make it an event. Connect with a non-profit organization or a fundraiser; whereby a percentage of each ticket sold goes to the cause. This also opens up the conversation when you are talking to people at school, work, etc. about your upcoming show. Connecting with a non-profit or fundraiser can also be really good promo for the band. Often, the organization will send out newsletters, Facebook messages, website ads, etc. promoting your upcoming event.

    Connect with the sponsors… they may possibly foot the bill and pay for the tickets, then you can offer them for free.

    If you are the one producing the show, align with a financial sponsor who may assist in footing the bill for tickets and in exchange you will put them on your website, social media blasts, Facebook and any where else they may be promoted.

    Keep an eye on what other bands are doing. Learn what is working for them to sell and distribute their tickets.

    http://www.thundertix.com/ticket-trends/how-to-sell-presale-tickets-metallicas-orion-music-and-more/
    http://www.grassrootsy.com/2011/03/09/how-do-i-get-my-fans-to-buy-pre-sale-tickets/

    Compiled by Rose’s DamnedOpinion

  • Copyrights

    Sarge_jokersPAYattention Your band is a business and the product is your music. Protecting both from being used by other parties who could make money on your creativity and hard work is a serious part of the business. Registering for a copyright on your music provides protection from having it used by others without your permission.

    1.What is a copyright anyway?
    A copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States for the original works of authors and artists, giving them the rights to their published and unpublished music and other intellectual works. What that means is that as the creators and writers of their original music, a band can keep exclusive rights to their work, including how and where it is distributed, who can distribute it, and who they allow to use it for other purposes. For more details on the purpose of the copyright, see http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf.

    2. Who started the idea of the copyright?
    Actually the first copyright laws were passed in England way back in 1710 with the Statute of Anne. The statute was created to encourage writers to continue their literary contributions by protecting them from others who would steal their works for their own financial gain. England had the good sense to see that by protecting the author’s rights, these talented people would be able to make a living as writers and contribute more works to society.

    Sarge Tip

    If you are interested in the history of the copyright process, check out this link for more info: http://www.copyrighthistory.com/anne.html.

    3.How does a copyright happen?
    Here’s the easy part; you actually have a copyright as soon as you or your band documents original work. The means of documentation can be as simple as writing down the lyrics on a napkin, recording the music in the garage, or the combination of both. Registering your copyright is what proves ownership of the material.

     Here’s where it gets tricky; determining who actually owns the songs. Are they owned by the band as a single entity? Are they owned by the individual contributing band members? Is the recording owned by the producer? What about the sound engineer and the session musicians can they claim ownership in the creative process?


    Sarge Tip

    The band members need to have some conversation and agreement early on in the creative process to decide who will have ownership of the songs. Understand that there are typically two types of copyright that may apply; one for the original music and one for the sound recording. In this article, we are generally referring to sound recordings..

    4. Get prepared for the copyright process


    1. The band determines amongst themselves the ownership (author) of the songs and the recordings.

    2. Establish the “creation” date with the recording process. A “creation” date will be required for your copyright applications.

    3. Be sure to have two master copies for submission to the U.S. Copyright Office. Keep the original master in a safe, secure location. Do not send the original with your copyright application documents.

    Sarge Tip

    Do NOT rely on the “Poor Man’s Copyright”. This is the method that some people believe is as good as actually registering with the U.S. Copyright Office; whereby you mail a copy of the CD to yourself. Remember you already have a copyright once you document your music, but the formal registration is what proves you have the copyright and gives you statutory benefit in case of a dispute.

    5. How to register for a copyright:


    1. The most common way is to register on line at http://www.copyright.gov/.

    2. Complete the Form SR, which can be used to register one song or the entire CD

    3. Pay the registration fee of $35.00

    4. Submit two copies of the recording

    5. Be patient; generally the processing time is 3 to 5 months

    6. Use the copyright symbol, i.e. “copyright © 2002 John Doe”. You do not have to wait until the registration is confirmed by the Copyright Office

    7. Store Copyright paper work in a safe, secure location with your master copy of the recording.

    Read more about the process here: http://diymusician.cdbaby.com/2013/05/how-to-copyright-your-music/
    If you are serious about your music, and of course you are or you wouldn’t have read this far; you don’t want to wait until your music takes off making money and then find that there are a multitude of entities that can claim rights to the creation of the music and subsequent album sales.  Please note, this article should not be taken as legal advice. This is meant to give you the basics on why copyrighting is so relevant to your band and some resources to find out more about it. We recommend that you seek professional legal counsel before entering into the copyright process.

    Compiled by Rose’s DamnedOpinion