• The Different Types of Record Deals

     

    Every musician dreams of the day they are offered a record deal. It’s the golden ticket to a life of fame, fortune, and luxury, right? Well, not always, but getting a record deal is an important step in advancing your music career. However, It’s important to know, that there are many different types of deals out there, and the key is finding the one that best fit’s with your current needs and long-term goals. Here are a few of the most common record deals that you see being offered today.

    1.The Major Label Deal- This is the big one! A major label gives you a lot of money up front (known as an advance), to cover all the cost of creating an awesome album. The major labels have all the tools to promote your album and make you the next superstar. Be careful though, these major labels don’t have much patience. If your album doesn’t do well they won’t hesitate to drop your contract.

    Sarge Tip

    It’s important to know that all royalties you earn from album sales will go towards paying back the advance, until you’ve paid the label back fully. So be sure to spend your advance money wisely!.

    2. The Independent Label Deal- This deal is very similar to the major label deal. The difference is that independent labels are smaller so they give their artist less advance money than a major label would. The good thing about and indie label is that they work very closely with the artist and you will have more creative control over your albums. There are tons of indie labels out there, and the chances of getting a deal with one is much higher than trying to get signed by a major label.

    Sarge Tip

    Just because you’re signed to an independent label, don’t think you can’t still make it big. If Adele, Taylor Swift, and Macklemore can become stars while signed to an indie label you certainly can too! .

    3.The distribution Deal- Also known as a P&D Deal (pressing and distribution), this deal is most common for artists who have had success on their own and want to stay independent. You agree to let a record label help you manufacture, distribute, and promote your album, and in return the label gets a percentage of the sales profits (normally around 25%). Remember, that in this type of deal you don’t get an advance so you’ll have to come up with the money to produce, record, and market the album yourself.

    4. 360 Deals- Also known as equity deals, participation deal, or multiple rights deal, this is the most common deal artists are offered today. In a 360 deal the label makes money not just from music sales, but from almost everything the artist does. The label gets a portion of profits generated from touring, merchandise, books, movie/TV appearances, basically anything the artist makes money from, the label gets a piece of it. This seems like a bad deal for the artists, but it does give the label even more incentive to support your career and to push you to make lots of money in every way possible.

    Sarge Tip

    Everything in a record agreement can be negotiated, depending on how much you bring to the table, and how bad the label wants to sign you. Lastly, before you sign anything make sure you have an entertainment attorney look it over first!.

    Compiled by Ernest Sallee

  • Cultivating Press & Media Outlets

    Sarge_jokersPAYattention As an entertainer, the press and media are a big source for getting the word out on your project. Think about where you normally go to discover new artists; on local newspapers, radio shows, blogs, podcast, etc. These outlets are here to serve you in the same way you are here to serve them. Without entertainers they have no content and without them you could never reach your full potential as an artist. Knowing how to collect and use these outlets to your advantage is a vital key to your success.

    1. Reach out to local press, which includes college radio stations, online magazines, bloggers, forums and industry related news.

    2. Politely introduce yourself and ask the proper way of submitting information about your project and if they wouldn’t mind sharing that information with their program.

    3. Develop a template that you can send out every month with your updates. Keep it separate from newsletters. You should make it sound personal so they think it is being sent just to them from you.

    4. Be sure to include personal contact information of who and how to get in contact with someone in charge of your project.

    5. Ask them if they know of any other outlets that you can benefit from so that you can expand your reach.

    6. Make sure to sincerely thank them. Develop a monthly newsletter and send them out to all of your press friends. 

     

    Sarge Tip

    Make sure you are extremely polite. Use proper grammar and signature lines.

     

    Compiled by Monty Burton