• Raising Social Media Awareness

    Statistics say that social media is increasingly influential to promote your music. Being active in social media increases traffic to your website and builds relationships with current and potential listeners of your music. It also increases more visibility on search engines and is a great way to reach a fan base or potential customers.

    1. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, Tumbler etc. are all examples of excellent, ever expanding, platforms for advertising and e-mail marketing.

    Sarge Tip

    By following some simple tricks you can raise awareness of your band’s music and get fans engaged without having to pay the social media sites.

    2. Increase Sharing: If, you want to people share your post, make “public” so that your followers can share or retweet it if they like the post. In addition to that, pictures are very alluring for social media shares. Sites like Facebook, Google, Instagram, and Pinterest, usually focus on photos. It’s a fact that people are more likely to share interesting photos than just words without a visual.

    3. Know what is trending: Connecting with current events or topics that your followers might be interested in is a great way to create interesting posts and create a buzz on social media pages. Following other people and re-tweeting their posts on Twitter are also good methods to boost your posts. Also, talking about music, movies, or sports will help to engage more readers.

    Sarge Tip

    Know your followers! Avoid controversial or political issues that could cross lines or offend someone

    4. Focus on what you post: Studies say that photos on Facebook or on other social media receive more engagement than other average posts. Sharing photos of events and fun moments will engage more followers. Give a shout-out now and then to your fans as well. Share some content posted by your fans such as fan art, photos of them at your show, etc. For example, a famous coffee shop recently featured a photo by of one of their customers. Make sure the content you post pertains to your band. Avoid posting things on your fan page which are personal. And always avoid posting negative comments about people, places or other bands. Focus on your upcoming shows, CD releases, and merchandise.

    Sarge Tip

    Link your Facebook posts with Instagram and twitter to extend your reach and impact.

    5. Focus when you post: Posting content on social media has particular times to reach peaks. Study says usually Facebook posts peak around 3pm EST. Frequent posting, like once or twice a day gets more engagement. Keeping in mind the best times to post is always a good idea. And make it a habit to keep an eye on the analytics of social media providers.

    6. Blogging: Writing blogs about your music and sharing it on your social media networks influences people. Great content; including samples of your music and videos enhances your online influence.This enhanced marketing approach is an effective strategy to expose your project to new people.

    7. ReverbNation and SoundCloud:
    Using ReverbNation and SoundCloud is a necessity for musicians. You can post your music on those sites and connect them with other social networking sites like Facebook, Google Hang-Out to reach more people. Another way to enhance your profile is by taking advantage of free mailing lists that are available to everyone.

    Sarge Tip

    Using the Sound Cloud app on smart phones is a great way to carry your music in your pocket.

    8. Get creative! Host a “like” party. Get your fans and followers involved. Have them bring their laptops or tablets. Enjoy snacks and drinks while watching bad “B” movies! Encourage everyone to log in and start “liking” pages and posts to help raise awareness!

    Compiled by Nazia Adnin

  • The Job of a Manager for an Unsigned Band

    In general, the band manager’s job is to take care of the business side of things allowing the artists’ to create and perform their music. The duties of the manager for an “unsigned” band vary depending on the stage of the artists’ career. Typical responsibilities include promoting the band and marketing materials like EP’s and assuring distribution to the proper press and media outlets. But, a manager may wear many other hats working for the band in a multitude of ways.

    Sarge Tip

    Whether signed to a record label or not, you need to have a written contract outlining the responsibilities and role the manager will play in your career. A formal agreement will keep miscommunications and surprises from happening later.

    1. Financial Management.
    The manager is responsible for handling the financial affairs of the band they represent; this may include everything from ensuring correct payment is received from the venue to paying the bills for promotional materials and hotel rooms. Another large portion of the financial management aspect is to actively pursue funding opportunities for their artists, such as a kick starter or fundraising for tours.

    2. Networking.
    This is nearly a 24/7 responsibility of a good manager. They should always be on the lookout for networking opportunities to meet new contacts and introduce their band to a broader listener base. In one word the manager is the mouthpiece of the band and an integral part of the band’s success.

    Sarge Tip

    The manager should have business cards and press kits with them at all times as well as have their “elevator pitch” prepared.

    3. Promotion.
    A manager should be an active participant in exploring potential promotional opportunities as well as determining the best activities for the band to participate in. Should they play a “free” show or be booked for a fundraising event? Should they stick with playing only events booked by a well-known local promoter?

    Sarge Tip

    In some situations, the band manager’s role is to oversee and delegate promotional tasks to the band members or others in their camp. For example, the lead singer may have the duty of keeping up with Facebook, the bass player may be in charge of distributing flyers, etc.

    4. Booking Gigs.
    The manager can help reduce pressure on the artists by ensuring that they are getting in to the right venues at the right time. For instance, booking venues where they are ready and able to play, and with shows that suit the genre of their music. Over-playing in the same place to the same crowd should be avoided. The manager should play a large part in getting the band good exposure in as large an area as they can penetrate. However, the band manager is not always the one to book the dates in conjunction with a large tour. Most large tours with headlining national acts have touring managers and promoters taking care of the dates and bookings. In this case, the band manager is only in charge of the needs of their own band.

    5. Negotiating.
    Acting as a liaison between the band and the venue and / or the promoters; some of the manager’s responsibilities may be to ensure that the band is playing for a fair percentage of the door revenue or a guaranteed flat rate for the show; and that there is water, beverages, or food provided; as well as proper recognition on the flyers and advertising pieces for the event(s).
    The manager is also responsible for signing all performance agreements on the band’s behalf.

    6. Coordinating / Scheduling.
      A manager should be the glue that holds the band together, staying in contact with each member and scheduling rehearsals and studio time that make sense for everyone.  Solidifying load-in and load-out times, making sure everyone and all equipment arrive on time for every show.  Scheduling promotional photo shoots and other public appearances is also an important part of the coordinating duties. Like a show or rehearsal, this will include making sure everyone can get to the location. The manager will probably also have a say in the photographer being hired for the shoot, as well as the overall look and theme of the shots.

    7. Technical Assistance.
    Depending on their own background, some managers have more skill and knowledge than others in this area. But every manager needs to have a full understanding of their band’s technical requirements. At times, this may require them to be in contact pre-show with the venue, the sound and lighting technicians, etc.

    8. Media.
    While social media has taken the world by storm, and most artists have their own pages with thousands of opportunities for self-promotion. The manager should definitely oversee all media outlets to ensure that the right message is being sent out across the internet, radio and publications relating to the music scene. A manager should always be working to get the band featured in local print media, online magazines, and radio stations; maintaining social media sites and keeping the fans updated about the shows is a very important task of a manager.

    Sarge Tip

    In some cases, the manager works directly with a publicist who is hired to handle all media relations.

    9. Coach.
    Although it is business, a supportive manager can make a huge difference to band members when a little life coaching is needed to keep them on the right track; the manager needs to be prepared to take on the role of counselor and therapist when needed.
    A manager must possess the skills to handle everything from diffusing quarrels between band members; to step in when band members need help to overcome drug and alcohol addictions; to give support during personal family crisis; or to be a shoulder during a bad break-up with a girl friend or boyfriend. Other coaching roles include always seeking out new outlets to get the music out there, like Spotify, Sound Cloud and I-Tunes. And also to give coaching advice on the band’s stage presence ensuring that they look as good as they sound, and are projecting the correct image to suit the band’s style.

    10. Send out demos to labels.
    When the time is right, and the music is ready, one of the most important jobs a manager does is to get those demos out to radio personalities and record labels. This will help increase the probability that the demo will actually get a listen! When assisting with the business side of an emerging band, the first priority of the manager is to get the band heard by the masses.

    Sarge Tip

    With a band manager… you get what you pay for. While it might be financially easier to have a family member or buddy in charge; they may not have the skills and know-how to take you outside your own backyard. At some point, you will need to hire a professional manager

    Compiled by Rose’s DamnedOpinion