• Successful Presales

    Like it or not, every band is responsible to help bring the crowd to the show; however, not every band participates in presale shows.  For those who do, understand that the presales help support the expenses that may include venue rental, sound technician, door person, security; pre show production costs like flyers, ticket printing, fees for advertising and promotion, ads in local publications and radio, booking fees, insurance costs, production costs for staging, equipment rentals, labor, port-o-lets, perimeter fencing, city permits, photographers; and post show costs including video editing, attorney fees, licensing for cover music, and any additional production costs. 

    1. Know Your Sales Goals: Be sure you know up front (and don’t be shy about asking) just how many tickets your band is expected to sell to fulfill your commitment to the show. Work out the details among your bandmates, set goals for each member to achieve on a weekly basis, and an overall total. Keep in mind that it gets easier to sell tickets closer to the show date, but don’t let that keep you from selling from the start.

    And it may hurt, but be honest in assessing the number of tickets you can actually sell at this stage of your band’s career. Do not commit to selling more tickets (just to get booked) than you can realistically sell. New bands often have to buy their way into a show by bringing in a set number of people; and the promoter will expect that you can bring in the number of people that you say you can. It’s just bad all the way around if you promise what you cannot deliver.

    Don’t be afraid to ask the promoter for tools to help you sell your tickets. They should be happy to provide you with fliers or other materials to assist you in getting tickets sold.

    2. Facebook Marketing: Encourage online sales and use all social media outlets available to you. Event pages on Facebook, promote it on your own Facebook page, blog about it on the band’s website, and Tweet it to the world. Just be sure to always include your contact information; email, telephone numbers, etc. Find out how many they need? Encourage them to bring friends by offering a special for multiple ticket purchases. And don’t forget to ask to be added to the official event page so you can send invitations from there.

    3. E Mail Marketing: Send direct messages to the fans that come out to your shows. You want them to come back and bring more people with them. The personal touch makes them feel appreciated for the time and money they spend to see you. Send them an email, text, or personal facebook message. This definitely helps you build that loyal fan base…. People want to be appreciated for their loyalty to you and your music. 

    Sarge Tip

    For tips on creating a good email list, check out our article “ Build an E-Mail List” – http://musicadvice101.com/buildanemaillist/.

    4. In Person: Reach out to family, friends, and everyone else you know. DO talk to strangers! Talk about your show! Offer tickets to people you encounter at school, work, parties, and people around your neighborhood. 

    Go check out the venue one weekend in advance. Mingle with the crowd that night. Convince them to come back again the next weekend for your show. Offer them a special price or a premium price that includes a free CD or merchandise item if they purchase tickets on the spot. People are more likely to buy while they are having a good time.
    Go to open mic nights and other shows in the area to show your support for other local artists. Networking at other people’s shows is cool as long as you are also supporting their music. Talk to the other bands and invite them out to your show as your guest.

    5. Make it Easy for People to Pay and Receive Them

    Have the option to accept credit cards. Use a reader or app on your phone to make it easy for them to pay on the spot. Pay Pal is another good way to make it easy for them to purchase. Do some research on Eventbrite or Ticketfly; using an outside source can help people buy online a lot easier.

    Remember it is your responsibility to get the tickets to them! It’s true that mailing the tickets to everyone who pre purchases will take a little time and some money for postage; but, snail mail still makes people feel special. And you have the opportunity to include something extra in the envelope; flyers for your next show, a postcard picture promoting your album, maybe even a drink ticket to be redeemed at the bar the night of the show. Be creative with what you can do to promote future shows within that envelope that you are taking the time to mail out.

    Another way to get the tickets out to the people ahead of the show; is to call arrange a meeting place to pick up tickets. Make it a mini-event at a centrally located coffee shop, music store, or pizza place. Your fans will appreciate the face time with the band. It’s a way to get tickets delivered to a number of people at one time and it makes them feel like a part of something bigger than just one show. Work with the shop ahead of time; give them the opportunity to offer something to the folks that gather to pick up their tickets. They may want to have some kind of special or discount coupons ready for them.

    6. Make it Fun, Give Them A Reason to Want to Purchase in Advance

    Make it about the crowd, not just about seeing your band. Find out if anyone has a birthday or special event coming up. Promise (and deliver) a birthday song, or VIP seating/area, bring a cake with their name on it. If you make it a party for them, they will bring friends and people that don’t know your band yet giving you the opportunity to reach new ears.

    Sarge Tip

    Utilize Facebook to find out your friends birthdays, anniversaries, or other occasions that can be turned into a happening at the show.

    Offer VIP passes that have extra value to them… sometimes a limo ride to and from the show, dinner or drinks with the band, autographed CD or t-shirt.
    Make it an event. Connect with a non-profit organization or a fundraiser; whereby a percentage of each ticket sold goes to the cause. This also opens up the conversation when you are talking to people at school, work, etc. about your upcoming show. Connecting with a non-profit or fundraiser can also be really good promo for the band. Often, the organization will send out newsletters, Facebook messages, website ads, etc. promoting your upcoming event.

    Connect with the sponsors… they may possibly foot the bill and pay for the tickets, then you can offer them for free.

    If you are the one producing the show, align with a financial sponsor who may assist in footing the bill for tickets and in exchange you will put them on your website, social media blasts, Facebook and any where else they may be promoted.

    Keep an eye on what other bands are doing. Learn what is working for them to sell and distribute their tickets.

    http://www.thundertix.com/ticket-trends/how-to-sell-presale-tickets-metallicas-orion-music-and-more/
    http://www.grassrootsy.com/2011/03/09/how-do-i-get-my-fans-to-buy-pre-sale-tickets/

    Compiled by Rose’s DamnedOpinion

  • Event Promo Checklist

    It’s pretty disheartening to know how good your music is and you still end up playing to an empty house. So we’ve compiled a “Must Do” list for both the promoter and the band to maximize attention and get the people out to see you. And if looking at these lists looks like a lot of work, you’re right! It takes a lot of time and energy to let the world know who your band is and why people should not miss your next show.

    For the Promoter:

    1. Establish the show date with the venue making sure that your date is not conflicting with other shows or events around town that may pull your crowd away.

    2. Ensure that venue fits the band’s needs; i.e. stage requirements, lighting, sound, etc.

    3. Do a thorough walk through with the venue manager. Get the specifics on load-in / load-out, parking for the band’s vehicle(s), the location for the band’s merch table, stage dimensions, available power sources for stage, and merch table. Also, know if there is a green room for the band and if wi-fi is available.

    Sarge Tip

    Take an outlet tester and check every outlet in the venue. This will ensure that you have the correct power sources, and avoid possible equipment damage from plugging into broken sockets. Always check breaker boxes. Make sure you have enough power!

    4. Negotiate the terms with the venue; including any guaranteed dollar amount for the band, who handles the door person, does the venue have their own sound tech, are any food /beverages included for the band (if not, find out what food places are nearby). A written venue agreement is the best way to avoid complications and misunderstandings for all parties.

    5. Check out the venue’s website, Facebook, and any sources they have for promoting the shows. Scout for sponsorship opportunities for your event.

    6. Talk with the other bands to learn how they are promoting the show.

    7. Get your promotion in order by reaching out on your social media pages. Use them to promote the date, and follow up on all inquiries and comments. Get good flyers prepared and have them posted in strategic locations and at the venue itself. Do a newsletter announcing the show. Utilize e-zines and online calendars to get the word out.

    8. Make contact with local ticket outlets like music stores and Ticketfly.

    9. Team up with non-profit organizations if it fits your event. A benefit for a local charity organization can be very helpful in promoting the event.

    10. Do a promo video for YouTube. Use it in your online promotions.

    Sarge Tip

    About two weeks in advance, make contact with the venue again to be sure that they have not double-booked or forgotten to book your date.

    For the Band:

    1. A performance agreement for the band is a good idea. If the terms are in writing between you and the promoter there is be no room for misunderstandings from either side.

    2. Be mindful of your Blackout dates. Do not over saturate one area by playing too often in the same places.

    3. Be sure the entire band is informed of show dates, venue, and location. All band members need to be aware and active in promoting the show.

    4. Get your show booked far enough ahead of the date to utilize any and all promotional opportunities; social media, interviews, reviews, flyers, and word of mouth advertising. Organize press and media outlets. Read Music 101 Article on Cultivating Press for the Media.

    5. The band should also do a walk-through of any venue they have not played before. While the promoter should have already visited with the venue manager, this is your music; be responsible for knowing the stage, lighting, sound and available power sources.

    Sarge Tip

    During your walk through, think about the lighting in terms of fans taking pictures with cameras and cell phones.These days everything is shared instantly on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. and you want the pictures to look good!

    6. Find out in no uncertain terms if there are comp tickets for family & friends, and exactly how many.Know how many people you are allowed to invite and avoid embarrassment to yourself, your band, the promoter, and the buddy who didn’t bring enough cash to pay the cover.

    7. Utilize some of those comp tickets to offer some kind of press pass for potential reviewers, blog writers, photographers, magazine and radio people. The more of those folks at the show, the more coverage you will get afterward. It’s important to know who they are and follow up with them.

    8. Pay attention to the other bands that are booked for the show, and make contact with them. If they have played the venue before, they may have some valuable insight about the place that the venue manager may have left out during the walk-through. Ask the other bands what they are getting out of doing a show here.

    Sarge Tip

    Promote, Promote, Promote! Make sure people know you are playing and get them excited about the show! Coordinate a contest in conjunction with the show….where the winner must be present at the show to claim their prize.

    9. Make the show a happening by promoting a birthday, anniversary, EP release, holiday, or other event that draws a crowd. Arrange a flyer for your band; remember to include sponsors, promotor, and the other bands. Get their logos. Be sure the promoter has these materials as well. Organize your street team to drop flyers in the weeks before the show.

    10. Create an event page on Facebook, make sure it is in line with the show. It needs to be as good or better than the promoter’s event page. The page must include show date, times, age restrictions, and other artists with web links for all bands on the bill. Select an official administrator for the page. The administrator is responsible for answering all messages, texts and posts generated on the page, in addition to keeping the page updated with the most current information on the show.

    Sarge Tip

    Do Talk to Strangers! Respond to all e-mails, comments, phone calls, etc. within a few days before the show.

    11. Take advantage of networking at the venue in the weeks before the show. Get a feel for the crowd that the venue itself attracts. Introduce yourself with flyers and pre-sale tickets.

    12. Organize a photo and video shoot for the event.

    Sarge Tip

    Pictures are worth a thousand words, but sound is sooooo much better. Do a video for YouTube, your event page, band page, and anywhere else you can post it.

    Compiled by Rose’s Damned Opinion

  • Raising Social Media Awareness

    Statistics say that social media is increasingly influential to promote your music. Being active in social media increases traffic to your website and builds relationships with current and potential listeners of your music. It also increases more visibility on search engines and is a great way to reach a fan base or potential customers.

    1. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, Tumbler etc. are all examples of excellent, ever expanding, platforms for advertising and e-mail marketing.

    Sarge Tip

    By following some simple tricks you can raise awareness of your band’s music and get fans engaged without having to pay the social media sites.

    2. Increase Sharing: If, you want to people share your post, make “public” so that your followers can share or retweet it if they like the post. In addition to that, pictures are very alluring for social media shares. Sites like Facebook, Google, Instagram, and Pinterest, usually focus on photos. It’s a fact that people are more likely to share interesting photos than just words without a visual.

    3. Know what is trending: Connecting with current events or topics that your followers might be interested in is a great way to create interesting posts and create a buzz on social media pages. Following other people and re-tweeting their posts on Twitter are also good methods to boost your posts. Also, talking about music, movies, or sports will help to engage more readers.

    Sarge Tip

    Know your followers! Avoid controversial or political issues that could cross lines or offend someone

    4. Focus on what you post: Studies say that photos on Facebook or on other social media receive more engagement than other average posts. Sharing photos of events and fun moments will engage more followers. Give a shout-out now and then to your fans as well. Share some content posted by your fans such as fan art, photos of them at your show, etc. For example, a famous coffee shop recently featured a photo by of one of their customers. Make sure the content you post pertains to your band. Avoid posting things on your fan page which are personal. And always avoid posting negative comments about people, places or other bands. Focus on your upcoming shows, CD releases, and merchandise.

    Sarge Tip

    Link your Facebook posts with Instagram and twitter to extend your reach and impact.

    5. Focus when you post: Posting content on social media has particular times to reach peaks. Study says usually Facebook posts peak around 3pm EST. Frequent posting, like once or twice a day gets more engagement. Keeping in mind the best times to post is always a good idea. And make it a habit to keep an eye on the analytics of social media providers.

    6. Blogging: Writing blogs about your music and sharing it on your social media networks influences people. Great content; including samples of your music and videos enhances your online influence.This enhanced marketing approach is an effective strategy to expose your project to new people.

    7. ReverbNation and SoundCloud:
    Using ReverbNation and SoundCloud is a necessity for musicians. You can post your music on those sites and connect them with other social networking sites like Facebook, Google Hang-Out to reach more people. Another way to enhance your profile is by taking advantage of free mailing lists that are available to everyone.

    Sarge Tip

    Using the Sound Cloud app on smart phones is a great way to carry your music in your pocket.

    8. Get creative! Host a “like” party. Get your fans and followers involved. Have them bring their laptops or tablets. Enjoy snacks and drinks while watching bad “B” movies! Encourage everyone to log in and start “liking” pages and posts to help raise awareness!

    Compiled by Nazia Adnin

  • Planning a Tour Budget

    So, let’s say you’ve got shows booked in several different cities, maybe even different nearby states…. What to do now? What is it going to cost? Planning the budget for taking your show on the road can be a daunting task; but we’ve gathered some information and good solid ideas for you to consider before hitting the highway…

    1. Transportation: Obviously you need wheels to get where you’re going. The ultimate is to have one vehicle to carry the band and all the gear. If your band is fortunate enough to already own a tour vehicle… that’s great. However, most new unsigned bands don’t have the perfect tour vehicle yet and will need to consider the expense of renting a vehicle and/or trailer.

    Sarge Tip

    Be as certain as possible that the vehicle is in good repair. Have the vehicle serviced by a good mechanic before you travel. A major motor vehicle melt-down when you’re on the road and don’t have the time or cash to fix it, can put a screeching halt on the entire tour!

    2. AAA: AAA Is a good investment for about $95.00 per year. Having a AAA card will definitely help get you back on the road if you have a flat, run out of gas, or any number of crazy unexpected little things that can happen when traveling.

    3. Insurance: Definitely be sure the vehicle’s insurance is paid and covers any potential incidents. Your instruments and gear are another story. A separate policy is advised to insure against loss, damage or theft of your equipment. Contact your insurance provider for more information on exactly what is and is not covered by the vehicle’s insurance. http://rockrevoltmagazine.com/band-aid-101-musical-instrument-gear-insurance

    Sarge Tip

    Make sure your designated driver is paying attention to the road and speed limits. Tickets are expensive!.

    4. Fuel and Mileage: Calculate your mileage and fuel costs ahead to make sure you know how much it’s going to cost you to get from point A to point B, C, D, and home again. With gas prices averaging around $3.00 per gallon, this is a hefty part of the tour budget. Using a fuel /mileage calculator site like http://www.fueleconomy.gov/ will help a lot in your planning.

    5. Tolls: Check and re-check your route…. Are there toll roads involved? While they may be the most fuel saving routes, do not forget to have toll money available. Toll cards like E-Pass or Sunpass can aslo be extremely beneficial when traveling.

    Sarge Tip

    Plan your route… carefully. Map it out so you can calculate mileage, fuel costs, toll expenses, as well as the nearest accommodations to each venue..

    6. Food: Hopefully the agreement with the venue includes some food and beverage for the band. If not, you still need to eat. Typically, the cash needed for food is about $20.00 per day, per person. We suggest packing some non-perishable groceries to take with you and finding out what’s available near the venue and hotel ahead of time.

    7. Accommodations: Chances are, you won’t have family or friends in every city that can put the band up for the night, so hotel frequent stay plans can help you save some dollars on room rates. Most hotel/motel chains have them. You just need your manager or one band member to sign up and be responsible for the reservations. Make reservations in advance so you know how much you’re spending and where you’re going to crash after the show. It’s great if you can get the frequent traveler card with a hotel chain that offers free breakfast!

    8. Parking: Check in to possible parking fees for each venue, or hotel parking lot. This can be an overlooked and unexpected expense that can really add up.

    Sarge Tip

    Consider the safety of the vehicle. Park in a well-lit area, preferably right outside of the room or at least within view from the room.If you are towing a trailer with a roll up door, park it against wall if possible..

    9. Venues: Do as much advance research on the venue as possible. You will want to know if Wi-fi is available, occupancy, stage dimensions, noise ordinances, sound technicians, and what equipment does each venue already have, and if there’s a green room for the band. Check out their websites and Facebook pages for pictures and comments. Make contact with the other bands playing, they may have good information for you and become great contacts later on.

    10. Merchandise: Don’t carry all of your merchandise with you. Leave some of it at home. If you need more while on the road, you can have someone from the home base send it out to you. Set up your merch table at each venue early.It let’s people know you are making your way along the tour by selling your stuff. And don’t be the first to take your table down at the end of the show.

    Sarge Tip

    Check out our Music Advice 101 article on Merch Sales: http://musicadvice101.com/merch-table-sales .

    Compiled by Rose’s DamnedOpinion

  • Street Team

     

    Having a street team to help you promote is one of the most effective ways to make people aware for your band and upcoming events. Many think that you have to be a record label or a huge promotions company in order to start up a street. In reality anyone can start a street team. All you really need is a little bit effort, creativity, and a lot of patience.

    1. Recruit, Recruit, Recruit.
    Start small and then expand gradually. A good place to start is by going to the ones who are most interested in helping you out such as family members and friends.

    Sarge Tip

    Don’t prejudge anyone. Consider everyone as a potential member of your street team. You may be surprised that your most loyal fan can turn out to be the most valuable member of your team.

    2. Have Strong Incentives To Participate
    Always have incentives to ensure your team members stay motivated and feel appreciated. You can offer members free merchandise, show tickets, backstage pass, VIP access, or maybe even pay them.

    Sarge Tip

    Get creative, have competitions, make some custom T-shirts, and most importantly ask your team members for their input on what they might want.

    3. Give Members Clear Instructions and Guidance. Be hands on and give team members clear task and instructions on what they are expected to do. Require members to generate reports (with pictures) as proof of what promotional materials they delivered, and which locations they covered.

    Sarge Tip

    Create a newsletter designated exclusively for team members. Remember you want to be as detailed and in-depth as possible when assigning task and responsibilities.

    4. Communication is Key.
    Communicate with the team on a regular basis and try to have face-to-face meetings whenever possible.

    Sarge Tip

    Make things simple and use technology to your advantage. Google Drive, online meeting software, and text message reminders, can all be very useful when communicating with your team.

    5. Incorporate Social Media Promotion.
    Have your street team help with online promotion as well. Have them share events and pages with their Facebook friends, and Twitter Followers.

    Sarge Tip

    Make sure you have a public Facebook and Twitter page dedicated to your street team. This will make it easier to attract new members, and to gain the interest of promoters.

    Author's Note

    You don’t want to overwork anyone on your street team. Understanding that even if there are strong incentives, if you have team members who are “burned out” they won’t be as enthusiastic or productive. It’s also important to remember that some people may be seasonal and members are going to come and go. That’s why it’s important to always be recruiting for new members, and to not stress too much over losing old ones. Lastly, never make anyone on your team feel uncomfortable. Different people have different strengths find out where the members fit best within the team, and avoid forcing someone to do anything they don’t feel comfortable doing.

     

    Compiled by Ernest Sallee

  • Cultivating Press & Media Outlets

    Sarge_jokersPAYattention As an entertainer, the press and media are a big source for getting the word out on your project. Think about where you normally go to discover new artists; on local newspapers, radio shows, blogs, podcast, etc. These outlets are here to serve you in the same way you are here to serve them. Without entertainers they have no content and without them you could never reach your full potential as an artist. Knowing how to collect and use these outlets to your advantage is a vital key to your success.

    1. Reach out to local press, which includes college radio stations, online magazines, bloggers, forums and industry related news.

    2. Politely introduce yourself and ask the proper way of submitting information about your project and if they wouldn’t mind sharing that information with their program.

    3. Develop a template that you can send out every month with your updates. Keep it separate from newsletters. You should make it sound personal so they think it is being sent just to them from you.

    4. Be sure to include personal contact information of who and how to get in contact with someone in charge of your project.

    5. Ask them if they know of any other outlets that you can benefit from so that you can expand your reach.

    6. Make sure to sincerely thank them. Develop a monthly newsletter and send them out to all of your press friends. 

     

    Sarge Tip

    Make sure you are extremely polite. Use proper grammar and signature lines.

     

    Compiled by Monty Burton

  • Creating a Facebook Event Page

    Facebook can be a very useful resource to promote an event. As you create your “buzz,” you can have constant contact with the people in your network. You can track the daily interactions and build an RSVP list to keep a rough estimate of how many of your ‘internet friends’ plan on attending. In connection with your daily face-to-face marketing experiences, you increase the chances of having a successful event.

    1. Log into the Facebook home page with the email address and password that you are registered with (it’s better to use your artist/band page as oppose to your personal page).

    2. Select “My Events” from the navigation menu. You will be taken to a page with all the events you are currently planning to attend. – Hit the “+ Create Event” button.

    3. Fill in all the details about your event, most importantly, the time and place. You can always edit this later, but try to put in as much details in as you can initially.

    4. Choose the level of access to your event. You can choose to host an “open” event (meaning anyone can attend). This will not restrict anyone from viewing the details and adding themselves to the guest list. If closed (meaning only select individuals may attend), only the time and description is shown to uninvited guests.

    Sarge Tip

    Facebook users can request to be added to the guest list to view the complete event info. A secret event will not appear in search results and will be viewable only by those you invite.

    5. Click the “Create” button to complete your event details.

    6. Upload a photo that represents the event. Use the browse feature to find a photo on your hard drive to upload. – The flyer for the event is sufficient.

    7. Now its time to invite some guests. Select your all your friends on Facebook that you’d like to invite. You can even send emails to people not on Facebook.

    Sarge Tip

    Check back to your event page often to monitor the response of the event. This page can be a useful tool to help with other ventures such as album releases, video releases and coordinating video shoots open to the public.

    8. If you’d like to just invite all your friends at once without having to click on each one of them individually, do a search for a “mass invite plugin” cheat.

    Sarge Tip

    Try not to over-abuse these plugins. Most of their codes are frowned upon by Facebook.

    Compiled by Monty Burton

  • Tips for Press Photos

    Sarge_jokersPAYattention Say “CHEEEEESE!” – If you happen to notice someone with a camera running around the venue during your set snapping photos, there are a few things you should keep in-mind to make sure the photos of you and your band don’t come out looking like blurry and out-of-focus blobs. 

    1. When performing, be sure to ‘pose for the press’ during your first few songs. Members of the press are usually only granted a limited time to get good photos from the restricted area near the stage. Make this time work for you.

    Sarge Tip

    Try not to jump around too much or get too sweaty before the photographer is done snapping shots of you.

    2. Try to introduce yourself to all photographers whom you see take your band’s picture. Get the link to the website where the pictures will be posted so that you can use it for your portfolio.

     

    3. Ensure all photo’s you release to be used in flyers and posters are high-resolution and large in size. (500-800 pixels)

     

    Compiled by Monty Burton